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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of On the superficial deposits of the Valley of the Medway found in the catalog.

On the superficial deposits of the Valley of the Medway

with remarks on the denudation of the Weald

by Clement Le Neve Foster

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  • 40 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Geology

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesQuarterly journal of the Geological Society.
    Statementby C. Le Neve Foster and William Topley
    ContributionsTopley, William
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. [443]-474 :
    Number of Pages474
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24829284M

      Brickearth is a term originally used to describe superficial windblown deposits found in southern term has been employed in English-speaking regions to describe similar deposits. Brickearths are periglacial loess, a wind-blown dust deposited under extremely cold, dry, peri- or postglacial name arises from its early use in making house bricks, its composition   Foster, C. N., and Topley, W., , On the superficial deposits of the valley of the Medway, with remarks on the denudation of the Weald: Quarterly

    Superficial deposits of various kinds are present, and were described by Topley in Geological Survey mapping on the six-inch scale in the s, as a basis for publication of the Scvenoaks sheet, recognised deposits of brickearth, river gravel and gravels mapped as 'Head', in addition to the alluvium on the valley floors Figure Clatford Bottom catchment and its main concentrations of sarsens, with the fluvial network based on the distribution of ‘valley bottom head’ (coombe rock).

      superficial deposits models with corner coordinates SW , to NE , comprising the South Glasgow, Paisley, Clydebank, and North Glasgow models were released. Note that due to data availability, the Clydebank and South Glasgow models do not cover the full Historically, the term diluvium was used to refer to superficial deposits that were formed as a result of the flood-like operation of water on the surface of the earth. The term appeared for the first time in a book by geologists William Phillips and William Conybeare titled “Outline of Geology of Wales and ://


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On the superficial deposits of the Valley of the Medway by Clement Le Neve Foster Download PDF EPUB FB2

On the superficial deposits of the Valley of the Medway: with remarks on the denudation of the Weald by Foster, Clement Le Neve, ; Topley, William   Introduction. During the last few years the subject of river-gravel has so much occupied the attention of geologists, that a short description of the gravel and brick-earth of the valley of the Medway will not be without interest, especially as those deposits have a most important bearing on the denudation of the Weald.

In the present paper we propose, firstly, to describe the superficial   Introduction. i tionoftheWeald. ptionofthesuperficial [ketchofprevioustheories, deposits. withobjectionstothetheory T his paper is an essay towards the elaboration of an outline sketch produced by one of the firmest hands that have ever worked in geological landscape, that of Playfair.

As he writes: When the usual form of a river is considered, with the trunk divided into many branches which rise at a great distance from one another, and these again subdivided into an infinity of smaller ramifications, it Topography and Superficial Deposits. The shoreline northeast from Arisaig Point (Pl.

1) is controlled by the outcrop of the rocks of the Bears Brook Volcanic Group. Between the shore and the Hollow Fault, however, the physical features depend more on the distribution of Medway estuary and Thames estuary (see Section ).

The London Clay Formation overlies the Lambeth Group and outcrops in the northern part of the administrative area on the Hoo Peninsula, including Chattenden and High Halstow, where superficial deposits are :// Superficial deposits (formerly known as 'drift' by BGS) are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about million years from the present.

They rest on older deposits or rocks referred to as ://   the Medway valley, and begins a gradual curve in a north easterly arc following the west bank of the Medway Gap towards Rochester. The approach into the River Medway is described by Hillaire Belloc in The Old Road and is an excellent way to explore the Medway Gap on foot and check out Belloc’s favoured river crossing at   9 Schematic cross-sections across the Clyde Valley, west-central Scotland, showing the stratigraphical relationships between formations and members and the assignment of groups and subgroups 31 10 Model showing examples of the relationships of formations, subgroups and groups of the Great Britain Superficial Deposits Supergroup in north-east   The chalky deposits can sometimes be seen in fields at the foot of the slope.

The uplift mentioned above not only created the Downs but also preserved a whole 'flight' of river terraces along our river valleys that contain a record of Pleistocene climate and the activities of early Following on from the highly successful Hydrogeology of the Chalk Conference inthe Hydrogeological Group of the Geological Society (supported by the Contaminated Land Group) will be holding a two-day conference on the Hydrogeology of the Superficial Deposits on 1- 2 May Covering current practice and future challenges in the management of superficial aquifers in the UK Hydrogeology of the Superficial Deposits.

These consist mainly of the superficial deposits of the Nile, the Euphrates and other large streams. At various points along the coast of Syria and Palestine are extensive sand dunes.

Frequently under the loose sand, or exposed, is found a sandstone which instead of being entirely siliceous, like most sandstones, is partly calcareous Types and history.

There are several types of superficial deposit, including raised beaches and were formed in periods of climate change during the ice raised beaches were generally formed during periods of higher sea level, when ice sheets were at a minimum, and the sand and shingle deposits can be seen in many low cliffs.

The brickearth is originally a wind-blown deposits/en-en. A reconnaissance field visit to the valley of the Kale Water in the Cheviot Hills was conducted over a two week period during This area forms part of the Morebattle sheet (GS Scotland 1inch, Sheet 18). Superficial deposits and landforms were mapped over an area of c.

30 km2 following definitions laid out in McMillan and Powell (). Paper with Topley to Geological Society “On the Superficial Deposits of the Valley of the Medway”, with remarks on the “Denudation of the Weald”.

Part-author of “Geology of North Derbyshire”(M.G.S.)with Green and Dakyns. Retired from Geological Survey. Specialised in The large dry valley, of which the existing stream merely occupies the mouth, has its in the neighbourhood of Cobham.

Its general direction is parallel and close to the axis valley has been cut G.E. HUTCHINGS, 64 BOOK REVIEWS BRITISH REGIONAL GEOLOGY: THE MIDLAND VALLEY OF SCOTLAND (3RD EDITION) by I. Cameron and D. Stephenson, British Geological Survey, NO. of pages: Price: f (soft covers). The Midland Valley of Scotland has been discussed at length in the past few years.

It contains, between two si nificant faults, rocks ranging in age from Cambrian to ://   The 'icing' on the county's geological 'cake', however, is the remarkable variety of deposits laid down during the Ice Age.

The Ice Age The rocks that have been formed during the present Ice Age are described as the 'drift' or 'superficial' geology.

They mostly consist of sands, gravels and clays laid down by glaciers, rivers, lakes and shallow to the geology of Essex. FOSTER, Dr.C. LE NEVE, and W. ToPLEY, Esq. On the Superficial Deposits of the Valley of the Medway, with Remarks on the Denudation of the Weald. GODWI~'-AUSTEN, Capt.

On the Carboniferous Rocks of the Valley of Kashmere; with Notes on the Carboniferous Bra- Many advances have been made in our understanding of tropical geomorphology in recent decades, but the field remains relatively neglected. With current widespread concern about the damage to tropical ecosystems, it is time for a new study of geomorphology in the tropics.

The author endeavours to provide a tropical perspective on geomorphology, rather than a compartmentalised "tropical. resulted in the upward movement of the chalk deposits (Bridgland ). From its source, the River Medway flows generally north-eastwards until Maidstone, where it changes direction to take a more northerly route (Figure 1).

It crosses the North Downs chalk mass near Burham, flowing within a narrow, steep-sided incised gorge (the Medway Gap).?id=|Hoo Peninsula, North Kent. By Robert John Langdon If you study any British Geological Society (BGS) geological map of Britain you will notice it shows a series of bedrock, sedimentary and superficial deposits.

At a scale ofkm and below these deposits start to form labyrinth of material that look like canals and gigantic waterways which lay under the surface on top of the bed   In he joined the Geological Survey in England, working in the Wealden area and afterwards in Derbyshire.

Conjointly with William Topley (–) he communicated to the Geological Society of London in the now classic paper “On the superficial deposits of the Valley of the Medway, with remarks on the Denudation of the Weald.”,_Sir_Clement_Le_Neve.